Realtors target Gen Y, USA Today readers don’t like it

The story:

Jacky Teplitzky used to turn to all the time-tested tools to drum up business for her New York-based real estate firm, Prudential Douglas Elliman.

Billboards. Mailings. Advertising.

Not anymore. The brutal real estate slump has made Teplitzky and other agents so hungry for business that many have decided to go after a group not known for its home-buying habits: Twentysomethings. And to try to connect with them, agents are unleashing a new breed of marketing tactics, from posting homes for sale on YouTube to building snazzy Facebook pages.

And a coupla comments from concerned USA Today readers:

Generation Z will obviously be sold into slavery at the rate things are going.

The obvious goal of the realtors and bankers today is to see if they can con generation Y into signing agreements to pay 150% of their weekly income for the next 500 years for a 6′ by 6′ patch of dirt.

About Andrew Kantor

Andrew is VAR's editor and information manager, and -- lessee now -- a former reporter for the Roanoke Times, former technology columnist for USA Today, and a former magazine editor for a bunch of places. He hails from New York with stops in Connecticut, New Jersey, Cincinnati, Columbus, and Roanoke.
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6 Responses to Realtors target Gen Y, USA Today readers don’t like it

  1. Seems each new generation requires a unique form of marketing.

    Maybe for the next generation we will just use:

    “Subliminal Marketing”?

  2. I wouldn’t put TOO much stock in the comments on the USA Today articles. I actually stopped looking at them after a while because they typically add little value to the story, and most of them are just vitriolic rants. It became to difficult to sift through the crud to find the occasional diamond.

    Regardless of what REALTORS do, there will always be a segment of the population who will turn up their noses. As long as REALTORS remain dedicated to their profession and to their clients, they will succeed. Every profession has it detractors.

    If there is one thing that basketball officiating has taught me, it is that the volume of one’s voice is typically inverse in proportion to their intelligence.

  3. Jeremy Hart says:

    Are we giving the impression that we’re trying to “can con generation Y into signing agreements to pay 150% of their weekly income for the next 500 years for a 6′ by 6′ patch of dirt.”? By reaching out to consumers in new ways, finding them where they’re at and acting as consultants and advisers, we’re not shaking the con man tag?

  4. Matt Wilkins says:

    I am a member of generation Y myself and completely disagree with the statement above by USA Today. I find that this generation is bombarded with information from numerous sources. A large part of my job with these clients is helping them separate fact from opinion so they can make an objective decision that is in their best interest.

  5. Jim Rake says:

    Ditto – Dan’s comments are spot on, “there will always be a segment of the population who will turn up their noses. As long as REALTORS remain dedicated to their profession and to their clients, they will succeed. Every profession has it detractors”.
    As they say, everybody’s got an opinion…and the view from the “cheap seats” is just that.
    By improving this business and its professionalism through better training, accountability and standards, we certainly won’t silence the criticism, but we can convince many of those detractors that the services we offer may just be worth the price paid.

  6. Matt said it best. I ran across a story recently that showed that a person today will get the same amount of information as a person alive 100 years ago did in their entire lifetime. It’s not information they need, it’s a filter to sift out all the crap.

    The way you appeal to Gen Y is leaving the information out there for them to find (Google search results, word-of-mouth, etc) rather than bombarding them directly with it (ads, direct marketing, etc).

    If your content is relevant, accurate and you have a good reputation with consumers and the online community, you will have a better chance of being seen as an expert versus just an opinionated person. That is what will capture the attention of today’s consumers.

    Btw, I’m on the Gen X/Gen Y cusp so I also speak from my personal experiences.

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