The other day I saw a Papa John’s pizza-delivery car that had several partisan bumper stickers on it. That, I thought, is just stupid — you’re guaranteed to turn off a sizeable number of people who see it. Yes, the cars are owned by the employees and not the company, but you would think Papa John’s would have rules. At most newspapers, for example, reporters are forbidden to put such stickers on their cars.

When you’re associating your business with your vehicle, opinion-free is the way to go. Especially when times in Virginia are changing.

votersSee, there are a lot of new voters signing up in Virginia. So points out a story in today’s Washington Post, which shows a pretty major jump especially in the northern and eastern parts of the state. (Login required or use BugMeNot.)

Since 2004, Virginia has added almost 250,000 voters; in contrast, Pennsylvania has added only about 45,000. And more are coming — 1,800 per week in Fairfax county, for example.

The political ramifications are obvious, of course: The new registrants are in predominantly Democratic regions, putting Virginia solidly in play for the election in November, especially considering the elections of Tim Kaine and Jim Webb, and with Democrat Mark Warner’s lead over Republican Jim Gilmore large and growing.

Many — but not all — of these new voters are recent transplants to Virginia. Others are old residents who are registering to vote for the first time. Either way, after November we may be looking at a very different commonwealth.