A new poll came out that shows we are happier now than before the financial crisis began. This likely either contradicts or validates what most of us think about income as it relates to happiness.

Ipsos, a research company, conducted a study of 19,000 adults in 24 countries, and the results show that roughly 77% of respondents describe themselves as happy, up three points from 2007 just before the crisis hit. 22% self-describe as “very happy”, up from 20% in 2007. Remember, of course, that happiness means different things to different people, and these results are different than polls measuring, say, “well-being” and “life satisfaction”, which you may have also read about and have more specific metrics attached to them.

The biggest takeaways: Emerging markets (Turkey, Mexico, India) don’t tend to share rich countries’ pessimism; and it seems to be definitive that happiness (or perception of happiness) is not linked to material wealth (there is, apparently, a happiness/wealth plateau; after hitting this, you should consider pursuing other interests than making money to ensure your continued happiness or “very happy”-ness).

Check out the full story and see where the U.S. ranks at the Economist.